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Quicksilver Rocks

There’s a great little freebie productivity app for OSX named Quicksilver, and it’s become a staple of my daily use. Simply put, it’s a launcher for OS X. More detailed, it’s a “launch and do something with this” tool.

Here’s its simplest form: I hit CTRL-SPACE to invoke Quicksilver. I then type in the first three or four letters of a program I want to launch (W-O-R-L-D) and “World of Warcraft” appears in a little two-pane window, with “Open” as the default action. Pressing the Enter key then launches WoW. Great, saves space on the old dock.

But, it gets better. Lets say I have a handful of photos I want to upload to Flickr. I go into the Finder, select the photos, hit CTRL=Space again. and this time hit command-g. This puts the selected items into the first action pane in Quicksilver. I then hit the tab key, type in Flickr, and there pops up the action “Upload to Flickr with tags.” I then press TAB to get to the third pane and type in the tags I want. Press Enter and the files get uploaded.

But wait, theres more! As part of my routine I need to upload a zipped file of screenshots to PC Gamer. Now, I could invoke Quicksilver, type in the enough of the name for it to find the file, then press TAB and type in “upload to site” and then tab again and have it choose the PC Gamer bookmark from Transmit. That’s an awful lot of work for a simple thig, So instead I can assign that whole action to what’s called a Trigger. I can tell it to take the Current Selection (so it’s not always the same zip file), tell it to upload to PC Gamer and assign a trigger to it, in this case command-ctrl-‘. Now, when I select something in Finder and press those three keys, off it goes to PC Gamer’s site.

The program rocks.

Ding, 60

Not that it matters much anymore, but I hit level 60 in World of WarCraft‘s expansion, Burning Crusades. Now that they’ve upped the level cap to 60, it’s about as notable as day-old bagels. But, yay, go me!

It’s been a busy few weeks getting those levels, and once I wrap the BC review next week it’ll be on to the Vanguard review.

Update

Wow, it’s been a while since I’ve updated. Insert obligatory “sorry I haven’t posted, I’ve been busy” comment.

In terms of published works since April, here’s a quick run-down: For Official Xbox Magazine:Final Fantasy XI review. PC Gamer published my reviews of Minions of Mirth, Face of Mankind, Auto Assault, Guild Wars: Factions, and the usual pairing of EverQuest-related reviews.

I’ve also been giving some thought to what I want to do with this site. While I’ll still be posting updates to my published articles, I’m also going to be posting periodic updates that aren’t just what got published recently. It’s also not going to be a blog in the personal sense. This isn’t a blog, per-se; they will be short articles around 500-700 or so words. I’m also not going to commit to a schedule—I’ll just be posting them when I’ve got some time.

Most likely first up will be a DragonCon report. I was down there this weekend and sat on a number of MMO-related panels.

January PC Gamer

This month is a bumper crop for my contributions to PC Gamer. My reviews of Dark Age of Camelot: Darkness Rising; EverQuest: Depths of Darkhollow; Toontown Online; and Star Wars Galaxies: Trials of Obi-Wan can be found in this issue.

The magazine has also been completely redesigned–something I naturally had nothing to with–but is now laid out in a clear manner.

Congratulations also to new Editor-in-Chief, Greg Vederman.